Morrie Schwartz & Mitch Albom

Tuesdays with Morrie

Tuesdays with Morrie – an old man, a young man and life’s greatest lesson

written by Mitch Albom, published by Doubleday
genre autobiography, 192 pages

 

A friend of mine recommended this book to me, he said it’s one of the most wonderful and inspiring books he’s ever read. I ordered the book online and after receiving it, read it within just a couple of hours. Morrie had come into my life, and he never left.

 


The story in short

This book is the final thesis Mitch Albom writes for his old professor Morrie Schwartz. Unfortunately Morrie has ALS and knows the end of his life is nearing as his body is getting weaker every day. Despite this horrible disease Morrie focuses on the little joys that are left in his life, he surrounds himself with the people he loves and feels blessed for having the time to say goodbye.

One of his visitors is Mitch, a former student who accidentally hears about the circumstances of his old professor when Ted Koppel of ABC-tv’s Nightline interviews Morrie for the first time. After the show Mitch travels to West Newton to say goodbye to his ‘coach’, as he used to call Morrie, not knowing that this visit will be the start of the last class Morrie will teach, once a week by a window in his home study, discussing ‘the Meaning of life’. For this class no books are needed, the lessons are taught from experience. The class meets on Tuesdays.

 

Morrie & Mitch | picture by Heather Pillar

 

Why you should read this book

The book is easy to read, but so full of life lessons that you might like to take a little more time to process all of Morrie’s wisdom. Many quotes will stick with you for a very long time. The book is very personal, actually it’s Mitch telling about Morrie, the progress of the illness and what that means to Morrie’s everyday life. At the same time Mitch tells about his own life, about choices he has made and new insights he gets during the classes with Morrie. He describes very personally how the disease and Morrie’s dysfunctional body bring them closer every lesson.

Even if you’ve never met Morrie, reading the book gives you the feeling that you get to know him and that you want to get to know him, learn from him, his positivism and wisdom. He was and still is a teacher. Have you ever had a teacher like this?

 

“People see me as a bridge. I’m not as alive as I used to be, but I’m not yet dead.
I’m sort of . . . in-between.” He coughed, then he regained his smile.
“I’m on the last journey here – and people want me to tell them what to pack.”

– Morrie Schwartz

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